Disability as Snow Sculpture

The frozen wheelchair, the wheelchair tipped over. Sculpted by the boys of fraternity row. I think I’d like to see that. 

Frankly I’d like to see anything in this Disneyfied nation that isn’t drivel. See Ariel Dorfman’s “How to Read Donald Duck”.  

Meanwhile the disabled must inevitably turn on their own snow machines. 

At Syracuse University the DCC (Disability Cultural Center) has been hosting for several years now, an annual conference called “Cripping the Comic Con” an event that brings together scholars, writers, performers, artists with disabiities or disability imaginations. A splendid time is guaranteed for all. 

Me? I’m so damaged by popular culture I shut it out long ago. 
As a kid I was harassed and physically beaten, always in the name of “Mr. Magoo” the cartoon character who couldn’t see. 

I saw cartoons weren’t friendly. I made friends with Huck Finn and Jim on their raft. 

Nowadays people come up to me al the time and say: “Hey have you seen Daredevil? You know he’s blind and all…” 

I haven’t seen Daredevil. I think its likely good for someone somwhere that there’s a blind superhero. 

But I have a suspicion, larger than a bread box, that Ameircan sentimentality can only handle disability as caricature—prevailing representation has to be two dimensional whether its Daredevil or one of Jerry’s kids

There are rare exceptions in popular culture. Push GirlsBreaking Bad… 

Disability makes its own snow sculptures, its own nuanced hyper-human drive toward the antithesis of abjection.

Cripping the comics is artful radicalism and this I applaud.

On the other hand (how many hands are there?) its best I think not to get carried away with the evolutionary progress of pop culture.

I don’t think that American Horror Story is a good turn in disability representation.

I’m glad I got that off my chest.